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Southern Association for Women Historians Conference

June 7-10, 2018

11th Triennial Southern Association for Women Historians (SAWH) Conference

Resistance, Power, and Accommodation: Women and Southern History

This triennial conference is June 7-10, 2018, at The University of Alabama, Bryant Conference Center in Tuscaloosa, AL. 

The SAWH conference provides a stimulating and congenial forum for discussing all aspects of women’s history.  The program seeks to reflect the best in recent scholarship and will appeal to a diverse audience, including university professors, graduate students, museum curators, public historians, and independent scholars.  Sessions will include topics within the many dimensions of southern women’s and gender history.

This year’s theme — Resistance, Power, and Accommodation:  Women and Southern History — is inspired by both recent events and the 100th anniversary of women gaining the right to vote.  We see this as opening a conversation about the many ways that women have fought for their place and rights, whether in the household, the workplace, or the public square.

The Jacquelyn Dowd Hall Prize is awarded for the two best papers presented by graduate students at the triennial Southern Conference on Women’s History sponsored by the SAWH. The prize is $200 to each recipient. 

Send your Hall Prize submission, with Hall Prize in the subject line, to sawh2018submit@gmail.com.

The deadline is May 21.   

 

Image sources from left to right:

  1. Black women in the United States Army Nurse Corps were assigned to Tuskegee Army Air Field Hospital to assist pilots and cadets with physical and psychological problems. Part of their training included ground school instruction, but they never flew during World War II. Circa 1943. [Courtesy of Air Force Historical Research Agency via Smithsonian Institution].  Image courtesy of Mito Habe-Evans, “Eleanor Roosevelt’s Flight with the First Black Aviators,” The Picture Show: Photo Stories from NPR, NPR, https://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2011/03/25/134769323/black_aviators

  2. Bruce Davidson’s powerful image from 1963 shows a black woman being held by two white police officers in front of a movie theater marquee sing that reads, “Damn the Defiant.” [©Bruce Davidson, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York]. Image courtesy of Daily Mail Reporter, “Time of Change: Remarkable Black-and-White Pictures from 1960s Bring to Life Historical Events and Intimate Moments from the Civil Rights Era,” DailyMail.com, and Bruce Davidson http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2357217/Time-change-Remarkable-black-white-pictures-1960s-bring-life-historical-events-intimate-moments-civil-rights-era.html

  3. On May 25, 1961, documentary photographer Bruce Davidson joined a group of Freedom Riders traveling by bus from Alabama to Mississippi – a trip that resulted in a series of poignant images documenting the civil rights era. [©Bruce Davidson, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York]. Image courtesy of Daily Mail Reporter, “Time of Change: Remarkable Black-and-White Pictures from 1960s Bring to Life Historical Events and Intimate Moments from the Civil Rights Era,” DailyMail.com, and Bruce Davidson http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2357217/Time-change-Remarkable-black-white-pictures-1960s-bring-life-historical-events-intimate-moments-civil-rights-era.html